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Oil Slick
10-15-2013, 10:22 PM
I was starting to think I was becoming a Cat Skinner with the many jobs I've been doing on the old D8. It started out as one job but all the neighbors heard me and come to see what's going on. So far it's turned into 5 jobs.

After talking with Bob Krocker and telling him my arms are getting tired he made me some 8" extensions :thumb: I'm not smart enough to calculate how much easier the frictions are to pull but the extensions are going to make my life easier.

Am I still a Skinner with the cheaters? Hmmm maybe this makes me a wiser Cat Skinner:wacko:

Oil Slick
10-15-2013, 10:25 PM
The ripper sure has been helpful. Even with me keeping the clamp tight it walks back n forth on the blade.

Arlie
10-15-2013, 11:07 PM
Hi Mike,

The lower half of that ripper sure has a pretty shine on it - looks like it is being well polished by all that ripped-up hard stuff. Good to see it being used and glad to hear that it has been helpful.

Just a thought - Would it be possible to tack weld or clamp a small block to the top of the blade on either side of where the ripper's top clamp is positioned? That might inhibit the "walking" that has been annoying you. I suspect that the shape of the slot in the bottom unit of the ripper is not well matched to the shape of the cutter bit on your push blade. If the bit doesn't wedge in tight, that might account for the "walking". I'd be interested in your thoughts on this.

Arlie

Deas Plant.
10-16-2013, 05:11 AM
Hi, Mike Mc.
That ol' girl is from the era when operators were MEN who did a MAN-sized day's work and thought they were privileged to be able to do it that way. LOL.

On a more serious note, you could start looking around for a Rivinius power steering unit for the D8. See the photos below.

There was also a spring-boosted system that I have only ever seen fitted to RD6's But I don't see any reason why the same system could not be retro-fitted to your H) D8. I thought I had some photos of this system but I can't seem to lay my grubby lunch hooks on them at the moment.

Just my 0.02.

Kelly
10-16-2013, 01:40 PM
Mike Mc,

Interesting concept lengthen of the steering clutch levers I have seen that before and in most cases not needed of the steering clutches are adjusted correctly. Did you try to adjustment the steering clutches and there booster springs? I dont recall the SN of your tractor, but after Sn21513 and up and the 13A greater capacity steering clutches were introduced in the D8s which were adjusted in a differenced manner than prior to 2U21513. When the steering clutches are adjusted correctly and still a little stiff, you can get the oil can out and give the bell crank assemblies a few drops oil, can make a word of difference.

The lower half of that ripper sure has a pretty shine on it - looks like it is being well polished by all that ripped-up hard stuff.

You might want to keep a close eye on the ware of the ripper point, it dont take long to ware one out when its in the ground all the time. A few sticks of Stoody (hard facing) would help.

"As Arlie has said Would it be possible to tack weld or clamp a small block to the top of the blade on either side of where the ripper's top clamp is positioned? That might inhibit the "walking" that has been annoying you

I would suggest doing just that. MK done that on the one we had a long time ago, welded a couple of gussets on both sides. It keeps it in line, and no more of problem coming loose, of course had to have the hot wrench to take off. LOL!

Good luck on your projects. With 5 jobs lined up youre going to be a dirt contractor yet. LOL!

Kelly

Old 3T lover
10-16-2013, 04:09 PM
I think the blade ripper is missing a piece. The replaceable point on the ones I had were in 2 pieces, a ripper "point" and behind the "point" a "Bonnet" that protected the ripper shank from wear. You could wear out several "points" before you wore out the "bonnet".

Kelly
10-16-2013, 04:30 PM
I think the blade ripper is missing a piece. The replaceable point on the ones I had were in 2 pieces, a ripper "point" and behind the "point" a "Bonnet" that protected the ripper shank from wear. You could wear out several "points" before you wore out the "bonnet".

Your right on that one. O3T, good eye. The photo of it laying in the weeds show no bonnet that I can see



4012040119 .

Correction; I dont think the one on the dozer is a model 1500. And, note on the diagram the ware collar is only on the 1500 model.

d4e
10-16-2013, 05:11 PM
Hey Mike, You should cruise over to Parker on your scooter there is a
D7 there with hyd steering been there for years probably get it petty cheap.

chumduffy
10-16-2013, 05:50 PM
Kelly is right if you get the adjustment right it dose not take much effort to pull the steering lever back. I seem to remember getting one adjusted "to good" one time and the lever would actually jump back and disengage it self, you would have to shove it back ahead to engage it. Once in a while it would hit ya in the hand and and make you take notice! Chum.

Mike Walsh
10-16-2013, 10:17 PM
Your right on that one. O3T, good eye. The photo of it laying in the weeds show no bonnet that I can see



4012040119 .

Correction; I dont think the one on the dozer is a model 1500. And, note on the diagram the ware collar is only on the 1500 model.

I've have two Hensley teeth which were used on a 3T and neither of them has a wear collar. Both came from the original owner who would have told me about a missing wear collar if they had come with one. Perhaps the wear collar was a later modification.

Arlie
10-17-2013, 12:26 AM
Hi Everyone -

I came across a US Army Corp. of Engineers Report on rippers for excavating frozen ground. It is in the form of a PDF file that is available at: www.dtic.mil/cgi-bin/GetTRDoc?AD=ADA327813. The report title is: "Ripping Frozen Ground with an Attachment for Dozers" by Paul V. Sellmann and Dale R. Hill, June 1997. The report looks older than its' date of publication (1997) and I could wish that the photos were of better quality because they are quite interesting.

The report deals with several rippers and dozers, but mainly deals with the Hensley 1000 HL, which looks just like mine. The Hensley 1000 HL is listed in a table at 305 Lbs. The text cites: "The total weight of the Hensley rippers varies from about 170 to 870 lb. The Ripper that I have loaned to Mike McW is a Hensley 1002 HL and, while I haven't weighed it, I would judge that it is one of the smaller ones, not even the 308 Lbs of the 1000 HL, because I was able to drag it a bit (but not lift it). However, the table lists the 170 Lb model as a Hensley 750 H, so mine is not the smallest one. I'd be interested to see a photo of that 870 Lb ripper, or better yet, a video of it working.

I took one of the photos ("Ripper in the weeds") that I posted on the other thread and magnified it, cropped it, and rotated it so that you can read the "Hensley 1002 HL" on the upper unit (the "Sleeve").

I also lifted a portion of text from one pertinent section of the report, and scanned some photos (there are a number of additional interesting photos - all of poor quality, unfortunately) and a table from the report which may be of interest. But, those who are really interested might do better to down load the PDF file. I found it interesting that they employed a simple skid under the dozer blade to limit the penetration of the ripper bit into the frozen soil. It sounds like it is tougher even than Mike's Bakersfield hard-pan.

Arlie

-----

Here's the text: (Please note that the "Figure 3" mentioned in the text is the same Hensley sketch that has been posted before.)

Removable ripper attachment for dozers

A less common commercial ripper attachment
is available for use on the moldboards of dozers
(moldboard refers to the curved metal plate that
makes up most of the blade on a dozer, snow, or
land plow; it is a continuation of the cutting edge
and is used to direct the material being displaced).
The attachment was introduced around 1947* and
is still available in several sizes for use on a large
range of bulldozers, depending on blade size, tractor
power, and weight. The length of these rippers
also increases with tractor size and weight,
with a maximum penetration depth of 2 ft (61 cm)
for the largest model. Attachment is not difficult.
The top of the ripper is secured with an adjustable
yoke that clamps at the top of the dozer
blade, and the bottom is engaged by placing the
lower part of the blade into a notch in the ripper
shank. This notch is constructed to distribute
forces to the lower part of the blade and cutting
edge. Figure 3 shows all the components of the
ripper, including the replaceable ripper tooth or
wear point. Rippers for smaller tractors can be
easily installed by two people since they can be
put on one component at a time. On the smallest
model, the largest and heaviest component is the
ripper shank, which weighs 112 lb (51 kg). The
total weight of the Hensley rippers varies from
about 170 to 870 lb (77 to 395 kg). The smallest
model has 11 in. (28 cm) of penetration and, for
our observations, was attached to the blade of a
John Deere 550 dozer.
Quantitative performance information for
blade-mounted rippers is not readily available,
compared to the large background of experience
and information on the more common rear-mounted
rippers. However, if it is assumed that
dozer blade penetration force and rear-mounted
ripper penetration force are similar for most
crawler tractors, it may then be possible to make
some performance predictions for the less common
blade-mounted attachment. It is interesting
to note that data for the D7H indicate that down
force on the cutting edge of the dozer blade is
approximately 21,000 lbf* (93 kN), which is very
close to the penetration force developed for a rear-mounted
parallelogram ripper on this tractor.
Horizontal force should also be similar when considering
either a front- or rear-mounted tool, both
having similar configurations.

Kelly
10-17-2013, 12:31 AM
I've have two Hensley teeth which were used on a 3T and neither of them has a wear collar. Both came from the original owner who would have told me about a missing wear collar if they had come with one. Perhaps the wear collar was a later modification.


Mike Walsh Hi,

Mike Walsh,
Hensley dozer rippers for the old 3T D7s was the 1000-H model, but depending on the height of the dozer you would need one of two model sleeves for Ripper model 1000-HRS or 1000HRL. These two model sleeves were made for the D6. D7. TD14.TD18. HD9, HD10, HD14, HD15 and other tractors with equal horsepower. Blade height of 24 to 36 for the HRS model, (with sleeve part number1002-HS) and 34 to 48 for the HRL model, (with sleeve part number 1002HL) the sleeves were interchangeable on the 1001-HR Shank that came with the 1000-H model ripper.

Your right, there was no wear collar for the model mentioned above. The only wear collar was for the 1500-H as shown in the drawing. But, Im sure some dirt contractor has and did interchange the shanks or sleeves of other models to obtain what they wanted. LOL! Hope this helps

Kelly

Mike Walsh
10-17-2013, 08:31 AM
Mike Walsh Hi,

Mike Walsh,
Hensley dozer rippers for the old 3T D7s was the 1000-H model, but depending on the height of the dozer you would need one of two model sleeves for Ripper model 1000-HRS or 1000HRL. These two model sleeves were made for the D6. D7. TD14.TD18. HD9, HD10, HD14, HD15 and other tractors with equal horsepower. Blade height of 24 to 36 for the HRS model, (with sleeve part number1002-HS) and 34 to 48 for the HRL model, (with sleeve part number 1002HL) the sleeves were interchangeable on the 1001-HR Shank that came with the 1000-H model ripper.

Your right, there was no wear collar for the model mentioned above. The only wear collar was for the 1500-H as shown in the drawing. But, Im sure some dirt contractor has and did interchange the shanks or sleeves of other models to obtain what they wanted. LOL! Hope this helps

Kelly

The Hensley teeth I have are somewhere in the bone yard and I haven't looked at them in a long time. From what I remember the shanks are 36" or less. They wouldn't fit on a 46A moldboard without modification. That puts them in your HRS category. Good to hear someone still remembers these things. Pretty handy when you have nothing else but a real pain when you've got a full dress D8 on site. Thanks for the info. Its going right into my archive.

Mike Walsh
10-17-2013, 04:08 PM
Hi Everyone -

I came across a US Army Corp. of Engineers Report on rippers for excavating frozen ground. It is in the form of a PDF file that is available at: www.dtic.mil/cgi-bin/GetTRDoc?AD=ADA327813. The report title is: "Ripping Frozen Ground with an Attachment for Dozers" by Paul V. Sellmann and Dale R. Hill, June 1997. The report looks older than its' date of publication (1997) and I could wish that the photos were of better quality because they are quite interesting.

Thanks for the pdf Arlie. I didn't see your post this morning when I replied to Kelly. All I knew about Hensley teeth before this thread was what I learned years ago from the guys who used them. Its nice to have some paperwork to back up those memories.

Oil Slick
10-17-2013, 08:40 PM
Kelly, the right steering clutch is much harder to pull than the left. You have some info on how to check the return spring and adjust the clutches. The serial number is around 23,300.

Mikee, your pm box is full. Are you interested in selling a ripper or two? I would like to get one for the Might D4 too. If so Red and I can make a run up to Gilroy and buy it. Thanks Mike 661-331-2996

Oil Slick
10-18-2013, 09:34 PM
Kelly, it sad the links were invalid. Please try again.

Kelly
10-18-2013, 10:11 PM
Mike Mc, Ok here we go again.....the last one worked for me!!!!!. will some one delete the first post?

With the Sn 23,xxxx you should have the up graded steering clutches that was induced with 2U21513 which are of greater capacity clutches and have the helical shaped teeth which drive the steel discs. Also the steering clutch levels should move 12 from engaged to fully disengaged position, the older type moved 20 from engaged to fully disengaged, and maximum steering clutch control level pull was reduced from 50# to 20#. I should have noticed you having the up graded steering clutches when I saw the master clutch lever but it slipped my mind. You may not get the requested results on the account of wear in the linkage, needle bearing and other components, but you should get close which well be better than what you have now, so give it a good try. See the instructions below.

Kelly

401454014640147

Mike, Be sure you understand about the steering clutch level locking screws and the spacers when adjusting the booster springs

Mike Walsh
10-21-2013, 11:14 PM
I got a quick peek at the Hensley teeth tonight before it got dark. I didn't turn the sleeves over so the only numbers I saw were on the shanks. 1001-HR. I'll check the sleeves out later this week. This discussion revived memories of our HD-10 and the time we borrowed a Hensley tooth to rip a house pad we were building. It sure seemed a lot bigger back then. The neighbor hired an owner operator to cut a road for him. I was really impressed by that 46A. He finished in a couple of days; we were still cutting.

Mike Walsh
10-22-2013, 09:16 PM
Kelly and Arlie. I made it back to the yard this afternoon and pulled the casting numbers off the Hensley teeth. The Sleeves are 1002HL, Shanks 1001HR and Top Yokes 1003H. The Sleeves look just like the one Arlie posted a picture of which is on loan to Mike Mc. Mike, I'll give you a call.

Oil Slick
10-22-2013, 10:23 PM
10-4 Mike

I felt like Deas today on the High Output. I've been building a bank back up and pushing the dirt up hill. Sure is a good workout for the abbs pushing the forward/reverse lever forward while holding both feet on the brakes.

Arlie
10-23-2013, 01:05 AM
Hey, Mike Walsh,

I found a higher quality version of the US Army Corp of Engineers report that you will probably prefer. It has some pretty decent quality photos, and they are in color. You can find it at: http://edoqs.com/pdf/paul-v-sellmann-and-dale-r-hill-june-1997_e26d27eaf11ee148708693c6a88edf40

Here is one of the photos in color. I was interested to see that the color of the ripper is blue. It is shown mounted on the blade of a D7