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Skinner
06-22-2014, 11:09 AM
:smile::smile::smile:Found and brought home a 2F Tailseat Twenty Two yesterday. Starts easy, runs and operates very nice.
Good straight tractor. Big smile on my face today4505045051450524505345054

Steve A
06-22-2014, 11:16 AM
I would be smiling to Very Nice !!!

JasonPayneCrawlers
06-22-2014, 03:39 PM
Great looking 22. Like the check breakers:rockon:

ronm
06-22-2014, 06:02 PM
sorry, wrong thread...duh

DPete
06-22-2014, 07:31 PM
Very straight, nice find

cojhl2
06-22-2014, 11:59 PM
Beautiful tractor. What are those things in front of the tracks?

Garlic Pete
06-23-2014, 08:39 AM
Very nice, straight, original, tailseat.

cojhl, those are check breakers. To flood irrigate an orchard, or sometimes even alfalfa or other open crops, you pull up a little levee running the length of the field. These are called checks and control the water to ensure good coverage of each section of the field. When you're ready to harvest or done with the watering, you use your tailseat Twenty Two with a leveler, disc or other implement to till everything up. You flip the check breakers down and they knock down the check right in front of the track, giving you a smooth ride and ensuring you don't get flipped out of the seat and onto the hood as you run up and over the check. The implement behind you smooths out the rest of the check.

Good find, Skinner. Looking forward to seeing it at Santa Margarita next Memorial Day, if not before.

Pete.

cojhl2
06-23-2014, 09:20 AM
Thank you Pete for the explanation. I appreciate your response to my question.

ronm
06-23-2014, 09:33 AM
Nice tractor, wish my D2 was that close to running...I like the seat, at least I know what a complete tailseat looks like-the pic in the parts book was all I had seen before.

Skinner
06-23-2014, 02:21 PM
Thanks for all the kind words. I was'nt looking for a twenty two but when I found this one I had to have it ! Pete nice explanation many folks don't know about flood irrigation as we do here in the Central Valley. We are planning to make Santa margarita Skinner

CR
06-24-2014, 04:29 AM
To elaborate a little on the Check breakers and why they are found on tractors that spent time in an orchard.

At the time period that these tractors were in use it was common in an orchard to set up a grid pattern of ridges or little levees that would contain a few trees up to maybe 100 trees depending on topography. Typically you would set up a ridge on a contour every .2' of fall then to control the water into each check there would be a series of cross levees or ridges every .2' or so of fall. The irrigator would fill up each basin and hold the water there for a while then move to the next basin.

So when making these basins when you put the first direction in the field was flat and you didn't have a problem. However when it came time to put in the cross levee or ridge every time you crossed another levee the tracks would dip down into the hole created by the ridge then the tracks would climb to the top or the levee while the back section of your tracks are now following down into the hole created by the ridge. Being on the back of a short tractor lends yourself towards getting bucked off the back as you have to pass numerous cross levees while making a perpendicular levee.

Fast forward most people went away from these small basins when land leveling equipment got better and orchards had to be moved from the more irregular contoured costal farmlands into the flatter valleys.

Now most levees are typically parallel and you don't see the small basins and cross levees. I think people get confused with this old technology when they now see on many field crops the holes created by the ridger have little dams every few feet to help block the water from running down these furrows instead of spreading out across the parallel basin. Crossing these little dams created by a blocker is nothing like crossing a ridge as was done in the past .

Skinner
06-24-2014, 10:59 AM
Very good explanation about the levees. A picture is truly worth a thousand words. We still use cross levees when preirrigating for a crop on a few fields that have more than .2ft. Fall per 100' and no side fall. only now the tractor is steering it self perfectly straight by GPS autopilot. Contour farming is a lost art around here thanks to laser leveling.

mrsmackpaul
06-24-2014, 02:49 PM
Very good explanation about the levees. A picture is truly worth a thousand words. We still use cross levees when preirrigating for a crop on a few fields that have more than .2ft. Fall per 100' and no side fall. only now the tractor is steering it self perfectly straight by GPS autopilot. Contour farming is a lost art around here thanks to laser leveling.
yes thank god for the end of contour flood irrigation the laser well what can I say its a bit like scope on a rifle shows how bad we really are have spent days dragging a land plane around a paddock and get it to water pretty good and then I bought a laser and scoop I thought there was something wrong but it was just so far out but what a difference once I was done less water a lot less salt to the point it all went and so much easier to water I could set a clock by it in the end

Paul