Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 17 of 17

Thread: Cleaning rust from fuel tanks

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Colorado Springs and Waitsburg WA
    Posts
    252

    Default

    I cleaned my gas tanks using Muratic acid and then making sure to neutralize them with soda solution.

    I don't coat them afterward but always make sure they are kept full. (This was a rule from the old days to keep tanks from rusting)

    I use an inline filter then instead the old sediment bowl.

    I've never worried about the diesel tanks because they looked ok and that is expected because of the diesel protection.
    John Liebermann
    2 9U's, 5J, IHC544, Ford860, (All working farm tractors)
    cojhl2@gmail.com

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    new hampshire
    Posts
    80

    Default

    I'm curious about the soda solution you spoke of as i'm about to do the same thing on a 9u tank. Do you mean baking soda?

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Las Vegas NV.
    Posts
    45

    Default Cleaning rust from fuel tanks

    I was asking about the citric acid that some have used to remove rust from the steering clutches.

    Chuck

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Colorado Springs and Waitsburg WA
    Posts
    252

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by whiteiron View Post
    I'm curious about the soda solution you spoke of as i'm about to do the same thing on a 9u tank. Do you mean baking soda?
    Same as, I keep a large package of Soda I get from Costco for several uses. It is used for cleaning. But in this case it is merely a base to offset any residue acid.
    Rinsing with plenty of water won't leave any residue but the soda is just an overkill.

    I did not coat the tanks becasue I am afraid that the coating over time will come off and casue additional problems.

    I just follow the oldtime rules and keep the tanks full of fuel.
    John Liebermann
    2 9U's, 5J, IHC544, Ford860, (All working farm tractors)
    cojhl2@gmail.com

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    scotland ct
    Posts
    82

    Default tank coating

    Be careful with using coatings in the tanks. I had some big problems with the additives in the gas today actually breaking down the sealers and plugging up the fuel system. I have worked on some high end antique cars that we worked on the tanks and the owners sealed them and the sealer broke down. I no longer seal the inside. It was 3 different products that all failed. As far as cleaning the tanks, I have cut an opening in the bottom of the tank and sandblast it clean if they are real bad. I also put 1 1/4" stone in the tank and strap it to the rear tire on the backhoe, pick up he back of the machine and let the wheel sit there and go around slowly for a few hours. This works well also. The best way to get the tank clean is cutting the bottom out and sandblast or a wire brush of a 4" grinder. Usually if the tank if that rusty inside there is going to be problems with the bottom being thin and needs replacing. I have done alot of tanks this way for cars, trucks and tractors. Always cut at the weld seam, you can put back together and no one will know.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Sedro-Woolley,WA
    Posts
    167

    Shocked

    I have had the same problems as CDW with gas tank sealers. I think that I have tried them all. I usually get a about a year's use our of a tank sealer before it starts to leak again. Cracks and loose seams seam to be the biggest problems for me when I use sealers. I usually get about 5 years before the sealer starts to peal and then it starts plugging up the fuel lines. The new alcohol fuel blends we are getting are even worse at making tank sealers fail. I have resorted to opening up the really bad tanks to get them clean again. With the small pony motor tanks, it usually has been the "shake it good" with crushed gravel to get them clean inside. I had the gas tank out of a Ford 8N hot tanked at a radiator shop. It took me about three years to stop the rust that their dip tank acid had started. I couldn't seem to neutalize their dip tank acid. The only way that I beat it was to keep a full tank when in storage and to drop a little diesel into the fuel mix to stop the rust. To weld up a fuel tank without blowing it up (which I have done a few of times), I have found the easiest and safest way to weld it was to run an air hose inside a clean tank with a good air flow coming out of the hose. The fresh air will chase the explosive fumes out of the tank faster than they can form a combustible fuel mixture. I have also tried CO2, and I also have tried using the exhaust from a tail pipe to evacuate the explosive gases. I have also tried filling the tanks with water except the area being welded. I have always come back to usng the air hose. For soldering up a fuel tank, I perfer a good hot copper soldering iron. A properly tinned seam will take on the solder like a magnet. And there will be no unburnt acetylene to accumulate in the empty fuel tank while using a soldering iron. When you least expect it, a fuel tank can really bruise you up good as it instantly comes flying apart. So around fuel tanks, be very careful, all the time. Yes, hot diesel fumes can explode too, but gasoline is the worst at launching a tank.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Killeen, Texas
    Posts
    58

    Default

    Haven't tried it yet, but I had this discussion recently and was told to try the electrolysis method. Fill it completely full of your soda/water mix and hang an electrode inside so it won't touch anything and wait for it to eat the rust out...
    Hopefully there are no thin spots. They told me they use sealer, but they will also drain their tanks (mainly gasoline tractors) if they're going to sit for awhile.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •