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Thread: D2 steering clutch replacement

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    257

    Default D2 steering clutch replacement

    Someone posted recently asking about D2 steering clutch replacement. I started mine this past weekend. This is the fifth time I've replace a clutch, so the work is probably going faster than someone doing it for the first time. The first set of pictures are six hours worth of work. That got me to the point where I could begin pulling the clutch. Note I removed the tracks as a unit. I'll drive out the master link before I do the track install. Previous owner had screwed up the master link. It will be a PITA to remove. The next set of pictures I'll attach are another five hours work, which includes pulling the pack and drilling and tapping holes in the remains of the busted brake drum collar so I could pull it off the shaft.

    During the final removal the brake drum busted. First time I had one break, but after seeing the clutch pack, the brake drum would never have slid off and the clutch was never going to break free. The clutch pack was a real mess.

    A tip....when you have the puller on the clutch pack, tighten as much as you can, then heat the clutch pack where it mates to the shaft. Then take a hammer and smack the end of threaded rod of the puller. This will cause the pack to pop loose. You have to removed the pivot bolts from the throwout bearing yoke. Then the pack slips off the shaft. I have three spare clutch packs. I'm just going to install the best looking pack. It will be tons better than the left side, which is worn, but still serviceable.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    1949 D2-5U w/D2N winch, 1950 D2-5U w/D2N winch, 1952 D2-5U w/ Cat blade, 1955 D2-5U w/ Cat Blade and D2N winch, 1937 RD4 wide gauge (currently non running), 1953 IH Farmall Super-A, Ford 9N, Case 580C, Hyster Sulky.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    257

    Default

    Removing the clutch pack and also the remains of the brake drum from the final. New seal waiting for me at CAT for behind the brake drum. Only $8. I used an OTC 938 17 1/2 ton puller to pull the clutch. I pulled the busted brake drum collar with a 10 ton OTC puller. It's a little smaller in size and suited the job better. I have various threaded couplers for the pullers and I use threaded rod and couplers to attach the pullers to whatever is getting pulled.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Arthropod; 04-25-2011 at 07:01 AM.
    1949 D2-5U w/D2N winch, 1950 D2-5U w/D2N winch, 1952 D2-5U w/ Cat blade, 1955 D2-5U w/ Cat Blade and D2N winch, 1937 RD4 wide gauge (currently non running), 1953 IH Farmall Super-A, Ford 9N, Case 580C, Hyster Sulky.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    long island NY, Hancock Ma
    Posts
    942

    Default

    Great posting!!! Detailed instructions with pictures---better than a shop manual!
    cat 941B, Cat D2 4U7412, Cat D3B, D4 7U30755

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Israel
    Posts
    67

    Default

    Nice pictures
    Great job
    You can see how important it is to work the right tool
    Most importantly you have the tool




    Itzik

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Nth queensland Australia
    Posts
    181

    Default

    Arthropod,

    Thanks for the great and detailed pics, I'm sure it will be a good referance for all that follow!

    Mike.

    .

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    257

    Default

    Thanks. I hope this post can help others. You guys know it's not rocket science, just hard work. But rewarding. Just need to take your time. I started wedging the final away from the trans housing using screw drivers, then chisels. I had it spread away from the housing over half an inch and it wasn't coming free. I then pulled out all the wedges and did it again. This time the brake drum broke and of course the final came sliding away and I could see the remains of the drum still around the clutch pack and the rest of the drum's shattered pieces lay in the final. Getting what was left of the brake drum (not much) off the final shaft was a PITA. I first drilled several holes all the way through it, thinking I could take my air chisel and crack it in two since it is cast iron. One side cracked and I could see it was loose from the shaft, but it still wouldn't come free. So then I drilled and tapped some new puller holes and used my 10 ton puller on it. It came out then. Then it's just the matter of removing the worn out brake band, old seal, clean stuff. Luckily I have several clutches from other machines I've disassembled. And I have some pretty good spare throwout bearings. All I need to purchase is the 8F3522 final seal.
    Last edited by Arthropod; 04-25-2011 at 11:43 AM.
    1949 D2-5U w/D2N winch, 1950 D2-5U w/D2N winch, 1952 D2-5U w/ Cat blade, 1955 D2-5U w/ Cat Blade and D2N winch, 1937 RD4 wide gauge (currently non running), 1953 IH Farmall Super-A, Ford 9N, Case 580C, Hyster Sulky.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Bainbridge NY
    Posts
    480

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lyoncat View Post
    Arthropod,

    Thanks for the great and detailed pics, I'm sure it will be a good referance for all that follow!

    Mike.

    .

    Arthropod, I have the same job coming up this summer, very valuable info

    regards Dennie
    Restored 1970 ford tractor,1931 Model A PU streetrod, lifted 1978 F150, 1971 VW bug, antique chain saws

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    257

    Default

    Glad it will help.

    I had the seal part numbers listed wrong. This should be the correct seals-

    Seal behind brake drum - old number: 4B4967 - New number:5K2595 @ $11.64 each.
    Seal behind clutch pack - old number:4B3675 - New number:8F3522 @ $7.49 each.

    They also still have the grease tube for the throwout bearing - 1H6752 @ $36 each.
    1949 D2-5U w/D2N winch, 1950 D2-5U w/D2N winch, 1952 D2-5U w/ Cat blade, 1955 D2-5U w/ Cat Blade and D2N winch, 1937 RD4 wide gauge (currently non running), 1953 IH Farmall Super-A, Ford 9N, Case 580C, Hyster Sulky.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Northern Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    1,271

    Default Grease tube

    Good post, thanks. Does the new "grease tube" come with a new carrier for the thrust bearing, because the old thrust bearing relies on the lube oil flowing along a channel into the race, and I can't see how grease would do the same as it doesn't flow.

    It would be like simply replacing the small oil cups on top of the trannies with grease zerks, and then thinking you have converted your old oil lube system in the thrust bearings with a new grease system. My RD4 had that "conversion" Those thrust bearings rely on the flowing ability of oil to reach them, so I'm interested to see the new grease line set up.

    Keep up the good work.
    regards
    Mike

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    257

    Default

    I don't have a scanned picture handy, but I'll explain best I can. There are two styles. The earlier style is like you say, there is an oil cup at the bottom of a metal tube that catches oil and channels it to the bearing. On the later style the cup is gone and instead a grease hose tightens to the rear yoke pivot bolt just like a brake line attaches to a brake caliper. So pumping grease into the grease fitting up top forces the grease into the bearing via the tube and then on through the rear pivot bolt (that has a hole through its middle). The left side of this machine is the old style with the oil cup and the right side happens to have the updated style.
    1949 D2-5U w/D2N winch, 1950 D2-5U w/D2N winch, 1952 D2-5U w/ Cat blade, 1955 D2-5U w/ Cat Blade and D2N winch, 1937 RD4 wide gauge (currently non running), 1953 IH Farmall Super-A, Ford 9N, Case 580C, Hyster Sulky.

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