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Thread: Fixing Moms Garage Floor - OT

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Default Fixing Moms Garage Floor - OT

    About 8 years ago we bought a quality tarp water collection set up. Worked ok but kept the water and melting ice contained so your always tromping in the water.

    The garage floor is very smooth except around the door area.

    Seems like it needs a thin layer of concrete with a slight slope were the water and chucks of ice will run to the center then out.

    Please advise on how to solve her problem?


    Thanks
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  2. #2
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    Long term, pour a cap on it if you have the elevation to do it (several inches from garage floor up to house) or break it up and repour it.

    If you want to try a skim coat you will need to scabble or at least etch the slick surface for good adhesion and then use the material intended for thin coating as directed. Usually in harsh environments the thin layer ends up delaminating over time. A garage might be better than the exterior pool deck and dairy barns I have experience with.

    Anything other than a cement mix will cost a bundle to build thickness to slope the floor. ........might be as expensive as repouring the slab. Epoxy coatings can be very slick unless properly sanded at the right stage of cure so the grit doesn't just sink into the surface.

    Are you sure there is no slope on the floor now? Seems like there should be some slope toward the door at least.
    D2-5J's, D6-9U's, D318 and D333 power units, 12E-99E grader, 922B & 944A wheel loaders, D330C generator set, DW20 water tanker and a bunch of Jersey cows to take care of in my spare time

  3. #3
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    Poly urea. Oilslick, you have a friend that owns a spray coating business....

    That's one hellofa bumper !

  4. #4
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    Mike--another option is to saw cut grooves in the surface to get water draining like we do on concrete bridge decks and concrete pavement
    maybe saw cut them perpendicular to the center line and then one longitudinal to drain away
    Cat 941B, Cat D2 4U, Cat D3B, Cat D4 7U, Cat D6 9U

  5. #5
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    Gravity rules!!!! Either the floor elevation needs to be raised and sloped or the outside elevation needs to be lowered. A good garage floor slab will have an additional taper right where the door gasket seals.

  6. #6
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    CC. No im not sure about the slope of the garage. There is plenty of clearance to pull her pick up in.

    I can see what your saying about delaminating as it freezes. If there were any cracks or water got under my new thin slab the ice would break it up.

    TOG, big bumpers are good. Lots of deer up here. Makes me nervous riding my bike when deer are standing on the road side looking at you.

    DP, that sounds like a good idea trying to cut grooves. Would it break up the floor if it freezes? Or would the ice just push up and out if the grooves aren't to deep?
    Last edited by Oil Slick; 10-16-2017 at 12:08 PM.

  7. #7
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    you should check the floor to see if it slopes in any direction and use that as a guide on how you want to run the water. the minimum depth of overlays on bridge decks was 2 inches but i would think you could go a little less. ever think of chopping a small hole and installing a sump pump? I did that on my sisters cellar floor that flooded some times on high tide
    Cat 941B, Cat D2 4U, Cat D3B, Cat D4 7U, Cat D6 9U

  8. #8
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    I'd say a single shank ripper on a D11 should just about fix it. lol

  9. #9
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    Find the low spot, drill a 6" hole in the concrete, then drill down 4' and put a piece of PVC pipe in the hole and a grate over the top of the pipe.

    Or sand jacking to raise the floor of the garage, and slope it so the water runs out.

  10. #10
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    Mom says she has to always sweep the water out.

    How would you drill a 6" hole in the concrete? We're in the Rockies so drilling down 4' could be a challenge for me.

    Grooving the concrete probably won't work because the main drainage grove will freeze up and not allow drainage.

    A fresh layer of concrete seems like the perfect fix. Got anymore details on doing concrete correctly?

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