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Thread: Recognize this machine ...anyone?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Fruitvale, British Columbia
    Posts
    137

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bighammer View Post
    My feeling is that it's a single pump with dual wheel motors (?) I don't believe that it has steering clutches. Here's a picture of the drive sprocket. I'm not familiar with the Torque Hub... Would that be the hydraulic drive motor for each side?

    Sorry for the late response.. computer problems...

    Mark
    I haven't worked on them for a few years but I think this might be the same drive that JLG and Genie use on manlifts. I believe if you need to push a dead machine with this hub you can take out those two small bolts and flip that little part in the middle so the nipple is facing in. I believe...if it is what I think it may be. Yanmar is top notch. Thrifty on fuel and will run and run and run. I know this is a site based on an American product but there's no denying the Japanese have got it going on with much of their machines and especially engines. I drive a Toyota Landcruiser and I pulled the original untouched engine after 550,000km and 30 years of day in and out service only because I wanted to put in a low km engine as a selling point then thank goodness I changed my mind and still have it today and it's up to 650km 🙂

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia.
    Posts
    1,131

    Default

    What a cute little tractor! I never knew they existed. Despite my fondness for good ol' solid American engineering, there have been times when the Japanese have produced products that are just as good as anything American, and many Isuzu products are in that category.
    I have an Isuzu 5 tonne tray top truck, built in '89 and powered by the 6.5 litre 6BG-1 engine. I bought it as a wreck and rebuilt it (it wasn't too badly damaged, I think they let it roll away down the yard, and it looked like it ran into a fence, with a big dent in the front of the cab, a broken windscreen and grille, and a badly bent bumper).

    The truck had done 708,000kms (440,000 miles) when I got it 3 years ago, the engine is original, it runs sweet as a nut, and starts instantly within 2 seconds of starter engagement every time.
    A 72 yr old guy around the corner from my shop has a similar truck with a tilt-bed on it. I stopped to talk to him, and asked him how many kms his has done. 2,500,000kms (1,552,795 miles), he told me!
    He got 1,500,000 kms from the original engine, and then installed a new rebuild engine, which has now done 1,000,000 kms. He talks about retiring, but he says while the truck still purrs away, he'll keep going, too!

    Re the crawler hydrostatic transmission arrangement - this setup is generally quite trouble-free, as everything runs sealed and in oil. Keep the oil clean, fix any leaks promptly, and they will last a long time.
    Generally, the only drawbacks with hydrostatic drive is they lose efficiency at high operating speeds, and they will often overheat under heavy working conditions and high ambient temperatures.
    The early JD hydrostatic drive crawlers were not good performers here in Australia, because they had regular overheating problems in inland areas during Summer, and when worked hard.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Posts
    12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OzDozer View Post
    What a cute little tractor! I never knew they existed. Despite my fondness for good ol' solid American engineering, there have been times when the Japanese have produced products that are just as good as anything American, and many Isuzu products are in that category.
    I have an Isuzu 5 tonne tray top truck, built in '89 and powered by the 6.5 litre 6BG-1 engine. I bought it as a wreck and rebuilt it (it wasn't too badly damaged, I think they let it roll away down the yard, and it looked like it ran into a fence, with a big dent in the front of the cab, a broken windscreen and grille, and a badly bent bumper).

    The truck had done 708,000kms (440,000 miles) when I got it 3 years ago, the engine is original, it runs sweet as a nut, and starts instantly within 2 seconds of starter engagement every time.
    A 72 yr old guy around the corner from my shop has a similar truck with a tilt-bed on it. I stopped to talk to him, and asked him how many kms his has done. 2,500,000kms (1,552,795 miles), he told me!
    He got 1,500,000 kms from the original engine, and then installed a new rebuild engine, which has now done 1,000,000 kms. He talks about retiring, but he says while the truck still purrs away, he'll keep going, too!

    Re the crawler hydrostatic transmission arrangement - this setup is generally quite trouble-free, as everything runs sealed and in oil. Keep the oil clean, fix any leaks promptly, and they will last a long time.
    Generally, the only drawbacks with hydrostatic drive is they lose efficiency at high operating speeds, and they will often overheat under heavy working conditions and high ambient temperatures.
    The early JD hydrostatic drive crawlers were not good performers here in Australia, because they had regular overheating problems in inland areas during Summer, and when worked hard.
    Thanks OzDozer, for the explanation of the hydrostatic drive.. good to know. I won't be running her hard too much, and I'll definitely keep the temperature in mind and operate accordingly!

    Mark

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Location
    Blackville SC
    Posts
    1

    Default Gerlinger lc30

    I just got this crawler and im looking for service manuals and a good place to find parts. Im also looking for seal kits for the cylinders.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Lancaster CA
    Posts
    623

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OzDozer View Post
    What a cute little tractor! I never knew they existed. Despite my fondness for good ol' solid American engineering, there have been times when the Japanese have produced products that are just as good as anything American, and many Isuzu products are in that category.
    I have an Isuzu 5 tonne tray top truck, built in '89 and powered by the 6.5 litre 6BG-1 engine. I bought it as a wreck and rebuilt it (it wasn't too badly damaged, I think they let it roll away down the yard, and it looked like it ran into a fence, with a big dent in the front of the cab, a broken windscreen and grille, and a badly bent bumper).

    The truck had done 708,000kms (440,000 miles) when I got it 3 years ago, the engine is original, it runs sweet as a nut, and starts instantly within 2 seconds of starter engagement every time.
    A 72 yr old guy around the corner from my shop has a similar truck with a tilt-bed on it. I stopped to talk to him, and asked him how many kms his has done. 2,500,000kms (1,552,795 miles), he told me!
    He got 1,500,000 kms from the original engine, and then installed a new rebuild engine, which has now done 1,000,000 kms. He talks about retiring, but he says while the truck still purrs away, he'll keep going, too!

    Re the crawler hydrostatic transmission arrangement - this setup is generally quite trouble-free, as everything runs sealed and in oil. Keep the oil clean, fix any leaks promptly, and they will last a long time.
    Generally, the only drawbacks with hydrostatic drive is they lose efficiency at high operating speeds, and they will often overheat under heavy working conditions and high ambient temperatures.
    The early JD hydrostatic drive crawlers were not good performers here in Australia, because they had regular overheating problems in inland areas during Summer, and when worked hard.
    JD construction machinery was all junk till they hooked up with the Japanese in the early 80s. Lousey pins and bushings, soft steel and leaky junk hydraulics that had a life expectancy of 3,000 hrs.
    Cat 12 grader, 8T6995 running and restoring, Cat 12 grader 9K3585. parts machine, Adams leaning wheel Pull grader Mod # 22, ser#438

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