Page 3 of 13 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 130

Thread: D9G Trouble Starting.....Fuel Issue?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    129

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wombat View Post
    I get the impression that this maybe a direct electric start machine, in itself will mean battery life will limit the amount of time that cranking the engine and bleeding will be limited. I always found a full fuel tank made bleeding easier as the filter tower etc would bleed by gravity. Tractor should start with lower than operating fuel pressure and quickly build after starting.
    Yeah, mine does

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gvanhouten View Post
    Thank you for that. I ordered the new transfer pump and will probably cool my heals as she is so frustrating. It has the old primer plunger type pump that all the seals are completely shot... that connect to the cover of the transfer pump... Thanks and I will update everybody with the new pump and gauge and see if that helps out...
    Everything will be alright, it's must work

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    AgroCatalog - free parts catalog, user and service manual for agricultural machines
    Last edited by MichaelSmith; 04-17-2020 at 02:36 AM.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    NW Ohio
    Posts
    4,219

    Default

    Sounds like some of you dont know the difference between injectors and pumps, you tell him to bleed the air at the injectors. Injectors or nozzle capsules are what injects the fuel and atomizes it into the prechambers, the pumps [on the injection pump housing] pump and measure the fuel to the nozzles. Open the air bleed screws on the pumps to bleed the air, it is not recommended to always loosen the lines due to damaging the line ferrules. But you can do it however you wish.
    Maybe Old Mag can show the service manual pic of bleeding the pumps.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Corralitos, Ca.
    Posts
    15,375

    Default

    Does get a little more complicated when some of the pumps don't have bleed screws. Seating and unseating the injection line ferrules is not a good idea.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    419

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Deas Plant. View Post
    Hi, gvanhouten.
    As per Bill Walter's description, I think you will get fuel as far as the injection pump with the throttle closed, i.e. in the shut-off position, but I think it needs to be open to get fuel to the injectors. As I understand it, closing the throttle right down moves the rack to a position where it shuts off all fuel supply to the injectors to stop the engine.

    Also, to be able to bleed the injector pipes, I think the engine needs to be turning to make the individual injector pumps send fuel to their individual injectors. If your tractor still has the decompressor control, I would suggest having that in the start position while you are bleeding at the least first couple of injector lines. Once you get clean. bubble-free fuel to 2 or 3 injectors, the engine may well start if you move the decompressor lever to run and the rest will likely clear themselves

    Now doubt, someone with better knowledge will correct me if I am wrong.

    Just my 0.02.
    Thank you for your reply.... What is most concerning is the gauge doesn't register any fuel pressure...So hence the new fuel transfer pump on its way... Yes the throttle (ie the governor I believe in the manual it is called..) Is a concern as if it is stuck in the off position it will never fire as it shuts off fuel into the cylinders... Thank you for posting and giving advice it is all so important...

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    419

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Old Magnet View Post
    Does get a little more complicated when some of the pumps don't have bleed screws. Seating and unseating the injection line ferrules is not a good idea.
    Agreed but I have gotten fuel to the injectors however without proper fuel pressure I believe it doesn't even enter the cylinder to be atomized... The injectors have to have a pressure range to open and close....

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    419

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rome K/G View Post
    Sounds like some of you dont know the difference between injectors and pumps, you tell him to bleed the air at the injectors. Injectors or nozzle capsules are what injects the fuel and atomizes it into the prechambers, the pumps [on the injection pump housing] pump and measure the fuel to the nozzles. Open the air bleed screws on the pumps to bleed the air, it is not recommended to always loosen the lines due to damaging the line ferrules. But you can do it however you wish.
    Maybe Old Mag can show the service manual pic of bleeding the pumps.
    I agree with what you are saying and Opening and closing can cause the ferules to wear and not seal properly... AM I correct that the pressure needs to be at least 25psi for the injector to open and squirt diesel into the pre chamber? Hence fuel pressure... The service manual states fuel transfer pump should be checked first after a number of other checks... All others checked out. Filters both primary and secondary. Bled system per manual and still no boom but no fuel pressure.. So I ordered new fuel transfer pump and gauge... Thanks for your help.....

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    NW Ohio
    Posts
    4,219

    Default

    The transfer pump supplies fuel at 20-25 psi through the filters and to the injection pumps, the injection pumps regulate and supply high pressure, not sure but I think 700 to 1200 psi to the injection nozzles, the injection nozzles have a set "crack pressure" that they shoot a spray pattern into the precombustion chambers then into the cylinders.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Corralitos, Ca.
    Posts
    15,375

    Default

    Capsule injectors should have an unseating pressure of 300 to 800 PSI. Discard if they don't make a minimum of 300 psi.
    The old flat seat injectors have an unseating pressure of 1500 to 1750 psi.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Southbrook Queensland Australia
    Posts
    846

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rome K/G View Post
    Sounds like some of you dont know the difference between injectors and pumps, you tell him to bleed the air at the injectors. Injectors or nozzle capsules are what injects the fuel and atomizes it into the prechambers, the pumps [on the injection pump housing] pump and measure the fuel to the nozzles. Open the air bleed screws on the pumps to bleed the air, it is not recommended to always loosen the lines due to damaging the line ferrules. But you can do it however you wish.
    Maybe Old Mag can show the service manual pic of bleeding the pumps.
    You are correct Rome .
    Some of the post's here are on totally the wrong track.
    I have a D 9 injector pump here and the individual pumps dont have a bleed screw like the other tractors here.
    The first thing to check is the movement of the individual fuel pump elements .
    This will require removal of the inspection cover on the side of the injection pump housing.
    Elements can be manually operated through here using a large screwdriver to pump fuel to the injectors .
    When the injector squirts this should be easily heard.
    Fuel should flow through a pump element if it is in the shut off positions .
    Element needs to turn to fuel on position to close the port so it can pump at injection pressure.
    While 28lb's is good for the transfer pump I have found provided the injector pump has positive pressure to it the engine will run.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •