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Thread: Load securement for heavy equipment

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    NW Ohio
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    3,926

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    Thanks, yea hauling equipment on rail cars takes extreme tie downs with rail cars slamming back and forth and they do bounce around allot on some of the older rails.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    B.C.Canada
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    Years ago we loaded a 245 Cat Hoe on a CN rail car.
    CN would not allow chains or boomers. The inspector said that it was
    because people would steal them at a siding. We had to use 3/4 inch cable
    with clamps and twisters.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Moose Lake, MN, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by 72hayes View Post
    Years ago we loaded a 245 Cat Hoe on a CN rail car.
    CN would not allow chains or boomers. The inspector said that it was
    because people would steal them at a siding. We had to use 3/4 inch cable
    with clamps and twisters.
    We shipped cranes by rail a few times. We used cable also. Had to be inspected by a railroad official before we left. After the railroad "lost" half a crane for three weeks, we learned to drive hardwood wedges into the couples between our cars. That kept the yard crews from separating our pieces. They finally found the lost cranes car body in Duluth, Georgia. The rest was properly shipped to Duluth, Minnesota.
    1937 Cat #11 tandem auto patrol,diesel, w/plow and wing, 6K506SP, 1937 RD 4 Ag Crawler RD5356, 1939 Cat 22 2F5429, 1952 Model 212 Grader 9T03427, 1953 2U D8 Dozer 2U20751, 1961 922A Rubber Tired Loader, 59A812, LeTouneau LS Cable Scraper, Cat/Lincoln 600 AMP Dual Welder, DW-21 Cat Scraper, DW-10 dump wagon/water wagon

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Poway, CA
    Posts
    1,830

    Default Wedges? No Slack? Hmmm?

    Hey Roger,

    It might be of interest to discuss WHY there is slack in the couplers that you wedged shut so they could not uncouple.

    I had a great Uncle who worked for and retired from the Pennsylvania RR. who explained that the slack is so the engine can get the train started from being stopped. It cannot move the entire train at once so each coupler's slack allows one car at a time to start moving. That is why you hear all the banging in the couplers working down the line as it starts moving forward. Interesting that you did not get any kickback from the rail road when you put in the wedges.

    He also told me stories of in the days of steam, trying to get trains started when the temperatures were near ZERO. Back and Forth then as I remember. Along with some heat to the "hot boxes."

    JanM

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Moose Lake, MN, USA
    Posts
    3,583

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    Quote Originally Posted by janmeermans View Post
    Hey Roger,

    It might be of interest to discuss WHY there is slack in the couplers that you wedged shut so they could not uncouple.

    I had a great Uncle who worked for and retired from the Pennsylvania RR. who explained that the slack is so the engine can get the train started from being stopped. It cannot move the entire train at once so each coupler's slack allows one car at a time to start moving. That is why you hear all the banging in the couplers working down the line as it starts moving forward. Interesting that you did not get any kickback from the rail road when you put in the wedges.

    He also told me stories of in the days of steam, trying to get trains started when the temperatures were near ZERO. Back and Forth then as I remember. Along with some heat to the "hot boxes."

    JanM
    I was fully aware of the requirement for the slack, Two brothers and a BIL were railroaders for the long gone Soo Line. I was a young lad starting outback then. I was the one swinging an eight pound sledge as ordered. As the lead mechanic said when it was mentioned, "its only three cars, if they cant pull it, they can add another horse on the front."
    1937 Cat #11 tandem auto patrol,diesel, w/plow and wing, 6K506SP, 1937 RD 4 Ag Crawler RD5356, 1939 Cat 22 2F5429, 1952 Model 212 Grader 9T03427, 1953 2U D8 Dozer 2U20751, 1961 922A Rubber Tired Loader, 59A812, LeTouneau LS Cable Scraper, Cat/Lincoln 600 AMP Dual Welder, DW-21 Cat Scraper, DW-10 dump wagon/water wagon

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Geelong, Australia
    Posts
    58

    Default Australian Load restraint guide

    See the attached link for the Australian guidelines which should give some perspective to the thread topic also.

    https://www.ntc.gov.au/codes-and-gui...estraint-guide
    Download the document (free)

    The guide now covers a large range of other transport items , so once you get through the 205 pages
    particular items which give good context of restraint calculations are case 6 on page 223
    and case 7 with the cross effect for smaller rated lashings.

    Chain hooks are covered on page 174.

    Restraint to track shoes - page 117.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    NW Ohio
    Posts
    3,926

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    D11R gettin a ride.
    https://youtu.be/oZd8-rCdEUM
    Part 2
    https://youtu.be/Ns1-fLm-IH8
    Part 3
    https://youtu.be/qZTh_xMqaUI
    This takes a little talent
    https://youtu.be/jaSIrPizwBs
    D11R rockin n rollin
    https://youtu.be/2uJBkUkK1o8
    The givin the Cat a ride
    https://youtu.be/kPllh2MgXcU
    Cat V12 in a Pete
    https://youtu.be/NTSVRr4LpGs
    Last edited by Rome K/G; 03-07-2020 at 08:29 PM.

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