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Somewhat O.T. - Although It Does Feature Cat Engines - Umberto's 'Toybox'.

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2 months 3 days ago #239655 by Deas Plant.
Hi, Folks.
Somewhat O.T. - Although It Does Feature Cat Engines - Umberto's 'Toybox':



The dozer has been saved, Sadly, the 'real' grader went to the scrapper some years ago. What many people don't know is that Acco built a 'prototype' grader before he built the 'real' grader. The 'prototype' only had single tires all round and 'only' weighed 160 tons as opposed to the 'real' grader's 200 tons.

Enjoy.

Just my 0.02.

You have a wonderful day. Best wishes. Deas Plant.

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2 months 3 days ago #239659 by trainzkid88
if i remember right they were supposed to go to lybia to build a big national highway.The Acco Super Bulldozer is the largest and most powerful tracked bulldozer ever made.[citation needed] It was built in Portogruaro in northern Italy by the Umberto Acco company. The Acco super bulldozer was constructed mainly of Caterpillar parts; however, many other components were specially adapted. The dozer blade, for example, is bigger than anything Caterpillar has ever made. This bulldozer has a gross weight of 183 tonnes and is powered by two 675 hp (503 kW) Caterpillar engines placed horizontally opposed, which deliver a total combined output of 1,350 hp (1,010 kW). The super bulldozer has a blade that is 23 feet (7.0 m) wide and 9 feet (2.7 m) high, whilе the total length of the bulldozer is over 40 feet (12 m), from the tip of the blade to the ripper on the rear. The ripper alone is about 10 feet (3.0 m) tall, being powered by huge hydraulic rams.[1][2]

This bulldozer was initially built to be exported to Libya in the early 1980s to help in land development.[citation needed] As the Leader of Libya, Colonel Gaddafi, was heavily involved with international terrorism at that time, the United States imposed a trade embargo on that country in 1986.[3] As a direct consequence of these trade restrictions, the completed Acco Dozer was never shipped to its intended destination.[4] This bulldozer has never been put to any operational use and was put into storage where it was built.[citation needed]

Acco ceased its existence when both Umberto Acco, the founder, and soon after, his son, died. They left no legacy to the management of the Acco company.[citation needed] In 2008, the main and secondary shops slowly turned into a dump yard of any kind of earth moving machinery, including the super bulldozer and its brother, a 200-ton super grader.[citation needed]

By the end of May 2012 the dozer had been moved away from the abandoned Acco facility and is now safely stored at a local gardening company in the same town to be preserved and eventually put on display.[citation needed] The Acco Superdozer moved under its own power onto the trailer that took it to the new location.[5][6]

The world's biggest motorgrader also was created in 1980 for the same project. It had two engines: the 700 hp front end articulated from the 1,000 hp rear end. It measured more than 24 ft.; weighed 200 tons; had a 33 ft. blade; and had a total of 12 tires — two per hub.

While in storage, the machine became a tourist attraction. It did not survive its time in storage and has been dismantled and sold for scrap.
A Major Roadblock

The dozer and motorgrader were to be used for a massive earthmoving project in Libya. It is unclear whether the machines were to be used for a pipelaying project or for other land-development but just as the dozer was completed, Colonel Gaddafi encountered an embargo by the United Nations, which included trade restrictions. The ACCO dozer and motorgrader could not be shipped to Libya.

The dozer was operated only once on a job in southern Italy. However, the cost of transporting it was prohibitive and both machines were placed in storage and maintained at the factory where they were built.

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2 months 2 days ago - 2 months 2 days ago #239683 by PhilC
Where did you copy and paste that from Kid

944A - Machine SN 43A2589 Engine SN 90A284
955K- Machine SN 71J3772 Engine SN 83Z0704
D6 SN's 4R732sp, 5R2724, 5R4832
D8 SN's 15A1254, 15A2287, 15A2723
Last edit: 2 months 2 days ago by PhilC.

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2 months 2 days ago #239686 by Deas Plant.
Hi, PhilC.
My guess would be Wikipedia (citation needed).

Just my 0.02.

You have a wonderful day. Best wishes. Deas Plant.

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2 months 19 hours ago #239738 by trainzkid88
yes and i should have sited the source. i actually had read about them years ago. i didnt know that it had been shifted and the grader had gone to scrap. good to see that someone cared enough to try and preserve them rather then let them rust away.

a old engineering shop i worked for made some of their own machines tools only a few of them were left. i used the overhead crane and the guillotine fairly often. it could cut 5/8 plate 15 ft wide the hydraulic pump and valve gear was pretty worn and used to cavitate and sometimes the control lever would jam a bump with my knee and it would work again. the only thing left now is the crane. to my knowledge the guillotine went to scrap after the sons sold the place after the old fella's death. old George died with his boots on he had a heart attack at the back door he'd gone home for lunch.

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