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Thread: d6c steering

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    victoria australia
    Posts
    2,893

    Default Cast Tubes

    Hi Team,
    cast tubes are/were used on several different models of machines in early days--just mentioned it in case--had seen some broken and repaired over the years due to incorrect tightening procedures--all is good for you with the flexibility in the steel units.
    Good work that your pistons are fitted correctly. What were the seal rings and bores like where the steer clutch hub runs in the bevel shaft bearing cage--what were the nylon seal ring end gaps like-- we used to re-sleeve the cage bores if they were worn/gouged due to loose bevel shaft bearings.
    Was the inner O Ring fitted between the bevel shaft and inner piston-under the hub retainer plate.

    Fluctuating oil pressure and the sounds of the trans. pump pumping marbles is usually due to the trans pump suction line leaking air.
    Had a 977 once with a rusted thru suction line--oil soaked out into the belly guard over night and sucked dirt and oil back during working day. Trans failed from abrasive wear in short order.
    Loose and hardened hoses on suction line were a problem too--double clamp them or better still use constant tension clamps--one with spring on the clamp bolt.

    From memory I am not sure if early machines had witches hat shaped suction screens at the front of the trans case where the suction line bolts to.
    Cat modified suction lines on many models of machine by fitting one piece hydraulic swagged fitting lines, a bleed off orifice elbow (P/No 307947 item #20 in the parts list column-- shown as #22 on diagram--#22 is actually pump mount seal) and return line from the trans pump pressure test/bleed port on top of the trans pump body.--cannot recall the size of the orifice but it was likely around 0.020"--this was to overcome aeration/cavitation erosion to pump parts and erratic pressures if I recall correctly.
    Is the trans pump lip seal facing outwards--if inwards, the pump will suck air as the bearing drain cavity behind the seal is connected to the suction side of the pump and so will allow air to enter the system.

    About all I can think of for now --will think on it some more and come back later.
    Cheers,
    Eddie B.
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  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    Tasmania Aistralia
    Posts
    18

    Default

    Thanks for the info, I cleaned the screen as i thought the fluctuation would probably be to do with restriction on the inlet side, ill have to check over the lines/ clamps and see what they look like.

    Bearings that were in it were fine really, i couldn't move the bevel shaft with a a bar under it, just changed them to be certain its all good in there, and on the advice of a certain character at Brighton you are probably familiar with!

    So its still on my mind the clutches themselves might be seized up somehow from sitting for ten years, assuming the piston is moving in and out like it should, I don't really know what else the problem could be. Is this at all possible??

    I'm going to run the machine again and get it hot to see how it behaves a bit more closely, then I'll pull it apart again. I atleast have to pull the covers off as they leak oil like a sieve as someone didn't seal them very well (me).

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    victoria australia
    Posts
    2,893

    Default Test Run.

    Hi Team,
    suggest test the clutch operation with the top covers off and look closely for areas of leaks where seal rings are used to see what and where oil may leak from--ie. rotating seals at bevel shaft bearing cap to steer clutch hub,--will leak more static perhaps than when turning, steer clutch piston actuation seal rings and so forth, split feed pipes to bevel shaft caps--have seen.
    Certainly possible the clutch packs are stuck but not a normal problem with wet steer clutches.
    Not familiar with addresses of ex W Adams employees or others in Tassy so as to ID who you are referring to on open internet.
    Keep at it--"Man built it, man can fix it"--"man will triumph over metal", were often used on difficult to solve/troubleshoot jobs by people I worked with over the years when the going got tough.

    Cheers,
    Eddie B.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    Tasmania Aistralia
    Posts
    18

    Default

    I was Referring to Dave at Tea Tree tractor spares, was thinking you'd be familiar with him he has a huge inventory of old cat parts, picked up all of William Adams old stock i believe.

    And yes i will do that, hook up the tubes with covers off and see what I can see. Too bad the pistons are way in there and cant see what they are doing.

    And thanks for the support, gotta keep at it!

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    victoria australia
    Posts
    2,893

    Default Aquaintances

    Hi Stuart,
    I worked at William Adams at the Clayton branch for 43 years and retired some 14 years ago now.
    Lots has happened since I left.
    I have sold off all my Cat stuff. Still have some of my old farm engines. Collect or make an odd model engine now and then to stay sane.
    Best Regards,
    Eddie B.

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