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Thread: Load securement for heavy equipment

  1. #1
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    Default Load securement for heavy equipment

    This film may not apply to your state but may apply as Federal Law.
    https://youtu.be/46hKizooXDk

  2. #2
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    I have some issues with that video---I myself would never attach a chain hook to the track pad--too many ways for it to fail--should be attached to a solid part of the machine, or at the very least wrapped around the track pad.

    Second, the rear tie downs should be capable of withstanding 50% of the weight in the forward direction , the front tie downs do not contribute to holding the machine in a forward collision, but are needed in a rear collision
    Cat 941B, Cat D2 4U, Cat D3B, Cat D4 7U, Cat D6 9U

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by dpendzic View Post
    I have some issues with that video---I myself would never attach a chain hook to the track pad--too many ways for it to fail--should be attached to a solid part of the machine, or at the very least wrapped around the track pad.

    Second, the rear tie downs should be capable of withstanding 50% of the weight in the forward direction , the front tie downs do not contribute to holding the machine in a forward collision, but are needed in a rear collision
    I agree it is better to chain to the main frame if possible, narrow thicker tracks are better to hook to, unlike wide thinner excavator track shoes, but some excavators dont have a good tie down location. I hauled a tracked Gradall for a friend and the shoes were loose on the rail, he just put the hook on the shoe and tightened it down, I was like ok....but there wasn't a any other good place too chain to the main frame, I just went a short distance, but still, what if?

  4. #4
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    Default Check Regulations!

    As far as I am aware, Federal Regulations are in place, but in many cases State Regulations are more stringent.

    https://www.dmv.ca.gov/portal/dmv/?1...s/cdl_htm/sec3 (California - as an example)

    Your commercial inspectors and enforcement officers are a good source of information and support. Remember - they are concerned for Safety - yours and others you encounter.

    Transporting many types of equipment in state civil service -- chained 4 directions to prevent travel in any direction ( an X for example) and at least one chain over each hydraulically controlled attachment - (to prevent movement as valve body may allow hydraulics to move due to vibration and jolts during transit) I never tried to secure a load in two directions with one chain and one binder - not a good idea.

    Articulated loaders for example. locked in place with safety bar and I always chained in an X from front axle and rear axle in center of loader. In other words, RF to bed at LR, LF to bed at RR on trailer - etc and one over the bucket. I felt much more secure than trying to cross chain with the bucket and lift arms in the path of the chains. Backhoes took a minimum of 6 chains and more if stabilizers could not be pinned in place. Each piece of equipment has challenges - key and goal is to prevent movement in all directions.

    Having worked many "incidents", failure to secure the load was a huge factor. Inspect each of your chains, hooks, binders and attachment points! Make sure cotter pins are in place, and hooks meet same requirements of the chain and binders match too. Tie over center binders to prevent opening. Remember - a chain is only as safe as the weakest link - stretched, bent, nicked, all reduce strength.

    Do not forget to clean your trailer, equipment, all loose items - loss of materials can be a deadly force! (recently on news - driver of truck nearly impaled by what appeared to be a lost sideboard - steel channel iron - stopped by the steering wheel sparing him by inches!)

    Safe travels!

  5. #5
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    you bring up a good point--are over center binders allowed under federal regulations???
    Cat 941B, Cat D2 4U, Cat D3B, Cat D4 7U, Cat D6 9U

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by dpendzic View Post
    you bring up a good point--are over center binders allowed under federal regulations???
    Yes, Over center binders are legal. The handles must be secured to prevent them from coming loose. Why anyone would want to use them in most cases is another question. According to the DOT taught class we took at work shortly before I retired, the load must be secured capable of holding the entire load in any direction. In other words if the load is 40,000 lbs it must be secured in all directions with a minimum of 40,000 lbs of restraint. That is why you see double and even triple chains on many heavy loads. However they had no issue with hooking a chain on a track pad. I personally don't like to hook that way. They also showed us on a number of places in the 600 page DOT book where it contradicts itself. To meet one requirement you are in violation of another. So it is true when they say they can find something wrong if they want to.
    1937 Cat #11 tandem auto patrol,diesel, w/plow and wing, 6K506SP, 1937 RD 4 Ag Crawler RD5356, 1939 Cat 22 2F5429, 1952 Model 212 Grader 9T03427, 1953 2U D8 Dozer 2U20751, 1961 922A Rubber Tired Loader, 59A812, LeTouneau LS Cable Scraper, Cat/Lincoln 600 AMP Dual Welder, DW-21 Cat Scraper, DW-10 dump wagon/water wagon

  7. #7
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    Thanks Roger---its interesting that your DOT requires restraints of 100% of the load but the federal regulations require 50%, which is close to the average coefficient of friction depending on the deck material
    Cat 941B, Cat D2 4U, Cat D3B, Cat D4 7U, Cat D6 9U

  8. #8
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    If you watch the whole video and listen to the officer he said that hooking to the pads is allowed if the pads are tight. He did say hooking to the frame is better.
    Chuck C

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck C View Post
    If you watch the whole video and listen to the officer he said that hooking to the pads is allowed if the pads are tight. He did say hooking to the frame is better.
    Chuck C
    I believe he also stated that "if" the frame has manufacturer mounted securing points, they are definitely the better choice!

  10. #10
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    Default Serious Cat Tie-Downs

    Great discussion. I was in Victoria Tx and saw this along side the road near the Caterpillar Plant. Thought you guys would be interested.


    CAT 335F Tie-Down 6.jpgCAT 335F Tie-Down 5.jpgCAT 335F Tie-Down 4.jpgCAT 335F Tie-Down 3.jpgCAT 335F Tie-Down 8.jpgCAT 335F Tie-Down 7.jpgCAT 335F Tie-Down 1.jpg

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