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Radiator material

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11 months 3 weeks ago #248725 by Ross1956
Radiator material was created by Ross1956
Hello guys, my Rad is leaking where the core tubes meet the plate, been experimenting with some soldering <sp> not laying down like it should and thinking it’s not a copper core, are these old radiator's heavy in brass? Thinking about getting my brazing tools out and going at it. Thinking ahead I decided to ask first lol

any tips and tricks would be appreciated, thanks for all the help guys.

Ross

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11 months 3 weeks ago #248735 by ctsnowfighter
Replied by ctsnowfighter on topic Radiator material
Brass is an alloy of copper and zinc
Bronze is an alloy of copper and tin, maybe some other elements too.
As such, copper being the primary metal, lead/tin solder will bond to either one of them - IF - it is clean!

"Clean" may require the use of strong acids and that can be hazardous both from dermal burns and inhalation of the fumes, especially when heated.
I knew a "radiator man" that said in extreme cases he had used Nitric Acid - that is a very dangerous and life threatening product in several ways but it was very effective when the others did not work.

Some radiator cores may be of aluminum or other metals. As such, they may not respond to solder as we commonly know lead/tin alloys.

If you have a few tubes leaking and you heat excessively as in melting Brazing rod - are you going to defeat your original purpose and warp the plate or de-bond the other tubes?

You might consider some of the "cold" based modern epoxies if they are suitable for the application.

CTS
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11 months 3 weeks ago #248739 by rax200
Replied by rax200 on topic Radiator material
Hi All,
Some of the early radiators are made of steel as I have a few on my machines.

Regards

Daryl

1937 RD4 4G4368
1940 D4 7J3717
1942 D4 7J9915SP
1942 R4 6G2550SP
1944 D4 2T6584SP
1945 D4 2T8978SP
1946 D4 5T6271
1956 D4 7U37855
1954 DH226 S/N 89 Howard Tug
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11 months 3 weeks ago - 11 months 3 weeks ago #248746 by trainzkid88
Replied by trainzkid88 on topic Radiator material
get a product called ezi-weld fluid 801 its zinc chloride based for normal use you use it at 4 to 1 for hard to solder like monel or stainless use it neat.

the secret in soldering is have clean material and heat it properly over heating actually cuases problems too.

if you get the core hot tanked it will clean it up properly.
Last edit: 11 months 3 weeks ago by trainzkid88.
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11 months 3 weeks ago #248810 by Ross1956
Replied by Ross1956 on topic Radiator material
thanks guys, going to get back to it this weekend when I get some of my other crap done I will let ya know how she goes.

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11 months 3 weeks ago #248814 by ctsnowfighter
Replied by ctsnowfighter on topic Radiator material
Heat source?
Oxy-Acetylene is in most cases is way too hot and difficult to control, especially on thin materials.
Propane (LPG) & Mapp gas is more friendly to soldering. MAPP is hotter (more BTU's)

Years ago, the common practice was to use Soldering Irons ( actually COPPER) that were heated, tinned and used for the heat source.
Very effective when used properly and there is no open flame involved in the actual soldering process. They are now difficult to find, maybe flea or swap meet for starters.
Sal Amonniac (spelling) was used to help clean and tin the copper.

I would suggest if you have not done much soldering, you practice on some scrap materials and gain some competence before tackling a radiator with multiple soldered joints.
Remember CLEAN surfaces and that solder will always run toward the heat.

Solder comes in several forms, each with their own general uses. Acid Core - general work, Rosin Core- electrical and Solid bar or wire (no flux)
There are also different alloys, 50/50 being quite common.
For use in copper plumbing, lead free is now mandatory and it too uses special fluxes and care.

CTS
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11 months 3 weeks ago #248869 by trainzkid88
Replied by trainzkid88 on topic Radiator material
yes silver solder uses a different flux and hotter temp. general lead free plumbing solder use the same as normal solder. each solder has a different working temp.

my great grandfather was a plumber he would get those copper irons so hot they would whistle as you used them.
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