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Photo's from a Bygone Era

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1 year 3 months ago #244702 by seyser
Replied by seyser on topic Photo's from a Bygone Era
 
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1 year 3 months ago #244703 by Deas Plant.
Hi, seyser.
Int'restin'. I dunno about here in the U.S. but back in those days back home, the great majority of grader operators operated standing up. That said, the only bit of anything like 'formal' instruction I ever had on a grader was from a man in his 50s who was almost as wide as he was high and not very 'athletic' at all. But, put him onna grader and he was poetry in motion. The first thing he told me was, "These machines have a seat. USE IT."

Thanks for the photo.

Just my 0.02.

You have a wonderful day. Best wishes. Deas Plant.

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1 year 3 months ago #244704 by Fat Dan
Replied by Fat Dan on topic Photo's from a Bygone Era

Deas Plant. post=243671 userid=933Hi, seyser.
What's with the guys in the Jeep with the loudspeaker on top? Are they being back seat drivers for the operators?

A kew-ree-yuss mind would like to know.

Just my 0.02. 

That was preYouTube ... Sargent Armchair, back then they were called back seat drivers, was using the loud speaker to critique the operator.🤣😂🤣

ACMOC Member
955E 12A08263; 955C 12A04040; 955C 12A03563.
1954 No.12 Diesel Motor Grader 8T14777.
1945 No.12 Diesel Motor Grader 9K9320
1944-46 Adams Model No. 311 Motor Grader
1943 IH T9 Bullgrader

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1 year 3 months ago - 1 year 3 months ago #244705 by Deas Plant.
Hi, Fat Dan.
There was an American foreman - whom we'll call 'Harry Zoaner' for the sake of anonymity - working on the Hammersley Iron Ore Rail Project in the Pilbara region of Western Australia in 1966. Our 'Harry' had a habit of standing up on top of a cutting, 15 to 20 feet above the machines working below and throwing rocks down at the machines to get an operator's attention. He did it one day to get the attention of a D8 dozer operator below. The rock landed on the hood of the dozer and bounced down onto the footplate - where it stayed.

The operator, a DowNunda boy, promptly stopped his machine, grabbed said rock and threw it right back up at 'Harry', FORCING him to dodge it - or be HIT.

THAT was the last time on record of 'Harry' ever throwing a rock AT a machine to get the operator's attention. After that, he aimed them well ahead of the machine. Message received. Pretty fair throw uphill by that operator too.

I have heard it said that communication is an art form.

Just my 0.02.

You have a wonderful day. Best wishes. Deas Plant.
Last edit: 1 year 3 months ago by Deas Plant..
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1 year 3 months ago #244707 by Wombat
Replied by Wombat on topic Photo's from a Bygone Era
Deas before I started operating 12E graders I noted how all the operators stood up, however when I started the chap who got me going told me to sit down, he said that way your eye is much closer to the line of your work, making it easier to identify when to cut and fill. I only ever operated sitting down. Just as an aside, clearing snow O learnt very quickly to place a corn bag on the floor, it stopped my feet from freezing, I worked roads in the area surrounding the Snowy project.

Wombat
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1 year 3 months ago #244711 by naylorbros
The early operators could have been use to standing after having stood on the platform of a pull grader for years.
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1 year 3 months ago #244715 by Deas Plant.
Hi, naylorbros.
I am pretty sure that that had a lot to do with it but I also think there were a couple of other things in there too. One would likely have been thinking that they see the blade better thataway. Another possible factor might have been the lack of understanding of just how much information an operator can obtain through his/her favorite rump steak about what their machine is doing.

On the other side of the coin is the fact that you have FAR better control of the machine if you ARE sitting down 'coz you can reach the clutch and the brake pedals much easier and QUICKER and you are more stable in the seat if you happen to hit the 'immovable object'.

But what would I know? I'm 'justa pore, dumm bulldozer op'rator'.

Just my 0.02.

You have a wonderful day. Best wishes. Deas Plant.
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1 year 3 months ago #244732 by seyser
Replied by seyser on topic Photo's from a Bygone Era
 
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1 year 3 months ago #244733 by seyser
Replied by seyser on topic Photo's from a Bygone Era
 
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1 year 3 months ago #244745 by seyser
Replied by seyser on topic Photo's from a Bygone Era
 
June 1964
Farm Forestry, General
Caption 1: Duchess County, New York. Lynfeld farm near Millbrook is an excellent example of good land utilization, combining regular farm operations 
with forestry. Some 30 acres of the farm's 275 is devoted to timber use. Here E. D. Brockway, District Director, 14 of the New York Conservation 
Dept., stops for a word with farmer Conrad Hamm. Above the fields to the left is a 34-year-old red pine plantation, "planted same year I was 
born," says owner Hamm. Stand was thinned in 1957 and chipped for stock bedding. 
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