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Found a one owner 1950 D2 5U with 3940 original hours

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1 month 2 weeks ago - 1 month 2 weeks ago #231314 by Markds3
Now a question for the experts, with the steering clutches adjusted correctly (at least 3 Inches movement forward at the top of the levers from their resting position - as per the maintenance instructions, see below) why are the levers sitting unevenly like pictured below? Is it because the steering clutches have worn unevenly from one side of the tractor to the other? I did notice the LHS clutch adjustment screw was a little bit further through the clamp bolt compared to the right. and what do I need to do to correct it, do I adjust the RHS clutch so it has more forward movement so they both sit level at rest?

 
 
 
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Last edit: 1 month 2 weeks ago by Markds3.

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1 month 2 weeks ago #231315 by Mike Meyer
I think there are rubber stops that set the forward travel of the steering clutch levers, you might be missing one on that side? Check out the brilliant D2 repair video's that "Sasquatch" has shared on youtube, I think there are links to them through this board, I'm sure he will have discussed them in one of his video's.
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1 month 2 weeks ago - 1 month 2 weeks ago #231316 by Markds3

I think there are rubber stops that set the forward travel of the steering clutch levers, you might be missing one on that side? Check out the brilliant D2 repair video's that "Sasquatch" has shared on youtube, I think there are links to them through this board, I'm sure he will have discussed them in one of his video's.
 


Thanks Mike, I can't see any rubber 'stops' in any of my parts lists and I assure you I have spent several hours watching and rewatching Toby's videos, unfortunately, he hasn't got up to the stage where he does the final adjustment on the steering clutches as he hasn't assembled the tractor completely yet. Maybe Toby could chip in here? @Sasquatch (I don't know if this will work, tagging members like this works on other forums I'm on ​​​​​​​
Last edit: 1 month 2 weeks ago by Markds3.

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1 month 2 weeks ago #231348 by Sasquatch
To adjust the positions of the steering levers you turn the acorn nuts that are on the other ends of the actuators in that compartment. You’ll have to remove the cotter pin first, but as you turn the acorn nut in the steering lever will travel forward. Turn the acorn nut out and the steering lever will travel back. 👍
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1 month 2 weeks ago #231349 by Markds3

To adjust the positions of the steering levers you turn the acorn nuts that are on the other ends of the actuators in that compartment. You’ll have to remove the cotter pin first, but as you turn the acorn nut in the steering lever will travel forward. Turn the acorn nut out and the steering lever will travel back. 👍

Thanks very much, Toby, I've had a look at the parts list and can see exactly what you mean. One more question, are the levers meant to be sitting vertical when at rest?

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1 month 2 weeks ago - 1 month 2 weeks ago #231350 by Markds3
Very much looking forward to your series on the 5J1113 continuing! I've just picked up a spare starting engine, and I am very keen to see yours going back together!
Last edit: 1 month 2 weeks ago by Markds3.

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1 month 1 week ago #231354 by neil
Hi Mark, are you planning to refurbish that spare starting engine? If so, one thing I did that you might be interested in is fitting crank thrust washers. The stock implementation relies on the main bearings being set in place to control axial float (015 or whatever it is). It's not a robust solution because the amount of surface area on the ends of the bearings is pretty small, but mostly because the main bearings are located axially by small dowels, which are meant to be a press-fit into the bearings. These dowels serve dual duty as oil supply conduits to the bearings. Another fellow on here turned down the rear inner surface of the block, the inner surface of the flywheel-end cover, and the crank cheeks, in order to fit 1/8 to 1/4 thick oilite thrust washers, sized to maintain the 015 float. The OEM bearings were then moved a little outboard (possibly shortened a tad) so that there was no possibility of contact axially. This removed the pounding input from the crank, even when not running but the tractor is clunking around in teh field, that is thought to be the primary reason for loss of tightness in the dowels.
I did the same to my pony, and am very happy with the results. It wasn't hard for the machine shop to do, once I told them of the importance of centering the crank axially, then taking an equivalent amount of material off each end surface so that the washers could be roughly the same thickness.
Of course, none of this is necessary but it's a nice upgrade to improve the longevity of the bearing system. The bearings and thrust washers can be made out of aluminum, or oilite or similar material. New dowels are important.

Cheers,
Neil

Pittsford, NY
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1 month 1 week ago #231365 by Markds3

Hi Mark, are you planning to refurbish that spare starting engine? If so, one thing I did that you might be interested in is fitting crank thrust washers. The stock implementation relies on the main bearings being set in place to control axial float (015 or whatever it is). It's not a robust solution because the amount of surface area on the ends of the bearings is pretty small, but mostly because the main bearings are located axially by small dowels, which are meant to be a press-fit into the bearings. These dowels serve dual duty as oil supply conduits to the bearings. Another fellow on here turned down the rear inner surface of the block, the inner surface of the flywheel-end cover, and the crank cheeks, in order to fit 1/8 to 1/4 thick oilite thrust washers, sized to maintain the 015 float. The OEM bearings were then moved a little outboard (possibly shortened a tad) so that there was no possibility of contact axially. This removed the pounding input from the crank, even when not running but the tractor is clunking around in teh field, that is thought to be the primary reason for loss of tightness in the dowels.
I did the same to my pony, and am very happy with the results. It wasn't hard for the machine shop to do, once I told them of the importance of centering the crank axially, then taking an equivalent amount of material off each end surface so that the washers could be roughly the same thickness.
Of course, none of this is necessary but it's a nice upgrade to improve the longevity of the bearing system. The bearings and thrust washers can be made out of aluminum, or oilite or similar material. New dowels are important.

Thanks, Neil, appreciate your detailed responses as always. Apparently, the engine is a good runner (although the previous owner took the magneto off for a spare to his own D2) and as I only paid $300NZD (Approx $215USD) for it I thought it would be a good way of securing spares for what seems to be the highest wear and most troublesome area on these tractors. I haven't made a decision yet if I will recondition it, as I haven't got it here yet (it's sitting at my FIL's house in Levin) and I haven't assessed it's condition. And as you say, I am well aware of the issues with the little dowel coming loose, the casting around the rear bearing cracking and the problems around crankshaft end float and I'm eagerly awaiting to see what Toby does to remedy this on his engines (He's mentioned several times he has a plan).

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1 month 1 week ago #231368 by neil
Ok sounds good. Would you have the serial # for the pony's previous owner's D2? I'm always on the lookout for my grandfather's D2 which was something like 5U14518 although I'm sure it headed to China decades ago

Cheers,
Neil

Pittsford, NY
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1 month 1 week ago #231384 by Markds3

Ok sounds good. Would you have the serial # for the pony's previous owner's D2? I'm always on the lookout for my grandfather's D2 which was something like 5U14518 although I'm sure it headed to China decades ago

I contacted the old owner yesterday (he's in Whanganui) and he tells me that his D2 is 5U8071 and has the large front idlers, a Birtley blade and a rear tank.

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